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defilerwyrm:

It’s like this.

The concept of angelic siblinghood is at once an abstraction and a concrete “fact” (in-setting, of course). On an abstract level, “brother” and “sister” are little more than approximations for angels’ understanding of the relationship as it applies to themselves, a translation from a language that predates carbon-based life into the Modern English derivative of a noise-pairing barely six millennia old tops.

These words are steeped in nuance. For humans, siblinghood is a complex system of hierarchal mutualism (at best) layered with loyalty, affection, and competition, expressed with varying degrees of antagonism and platonic intimacy (the forms of which are given boundaries by culture), and usually shared genetics. A power dynamic forms between siblings based largely on age differences, modified by other factors such as disparities in aptitude, socialisation, or physical condition. These dynamics tend to shift over time; a healthy sibling relationship is egalitarian by the time all parties involved are adults, but it’s far more pronounced in childhood. Most parents encourage the power difference between young siblings by charging elder siblings to protect and be kind to the younger ones, and charging younger siblings to obey the elder ones (thus reinforcing the cultural norm of age-rank). Children are extremely sensitive to any perceived favouritism, so siblings commonly wage years-long, even lifelong “secret wars” to undermine each other as they jockey for their parental figures’ favour.

These dynamics are formed by spending their developmental years in close quarters; siblings separated at birth who meet later in life do not share the same level of intricacy to their relationships, largely because they lack the history of hierarchal interactions.

(It’s interesting to note here that in this sense, angels as a collective might have more of an elder sibling/younger sibling relationship to humanity than individual angels do with each other.)

The angels of SPN do share some key similarities to human sibling dynamics, primarily in terms of loyalty, affection (albeit muted in expression compared to ours), and interacting with each other with one eye fixed on their “parental figure” for approval. However, their power dynamics more closely mirror human military systems (even borrowing English military terms to explain their rank-relationships to humans) in their rigidity and clear command structure based on Choir first and individual merit second. That some of them are closer than others and that some share rivalries does not contradict this reading; soldiers who form close bonds are called “brothers in arms” for good reason, after all.

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(via littlehollyleaf)

Source: defilerwyrm
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johannathemad:

this can’t be possible. now i ship them.

all because of these gorgeous gifs

Source: johannathemad
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mugglenet:

  • For Hagrid, keeping dangerous creatures is all about overcoming something that could kill him.

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Find more expanded canon on MuggleNet

My headcanon is that Hagrid sees himself as a monstrous, difficult to approach person.  He’s a big dude, he knows people are intimidated by him, but on the inside he’s a warm, friendly person with a kind heart.  He knows appearances can be deceiving, so he looks for signs of that in others.

Source: mugglenet
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disgruntledvillager:

Thranduil takes legolas to the baby pageant and they are going to win 

Source: disgruntledvillager
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athenachan-art:

Puh It’s done. It’s hard to capture his beauty, I’m sure this isn’t my last attempt.

Source: athenachan-art
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castielofmorgoth:

Guys I made a thing
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